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By Geoffrey N. Leech

Seeks to illustrate that the learn of English poetry is enriched through the insights of contemporary linguistic research, and that linguistic and demanding disciplines aren't separate yet complementary. analyzing a variety of poetry, Professor Leech considers many facets of poetic kind, together with the language of earlier and current, inventive language, poetic licence, repetition, sound, metre, context and ambiguity.

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A Linguistic Guide to English Poetry

Seeks to illustrate that the examine of English poetry is enriched by way of the insights of recent linguistic research, and that linguistic and significant disciplines will not be separate yet complementary. studying a variety of poetry, Professor Leech considers many elements of poetic variety, together with the language of previous and current, artistic language, poetic licence, repetition, sound, metre, context and ambiguity.

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11' d cesto commUlllca . aserrors, as trrvia 1111 :an . £i . t bit of in ormatIon. e , may convey q~ll ea. (authoritis for arthritis), at least tells us someth mg example of rna apropism fi r etrator In the second exabout the education, ch,ar;~ter, et~~b~y I~~:;e;ts that its author is a forample, the ungrammatIca iry prod fE lish The third example, occure~gn~r with, a~e~~~::f~~~~~1~:::~h~ th~~rin~er has made a mistake, that a carele:s deliberately imitated for artIstIC or conuc e ecr, < :~~ga:~l:~r: ~~~ proo~-~eader, et~.

This expectation is fulfilled in the following passage from The Merchant of Veil ice 69 in being divisible into an immediate interpretation and a wider in~erpreta­ tion, which takes into account its relation to other foregroundmg, and ultimately to the whole work in which it appears. betwee~l kissed and killed. This is similar to the 'mice and men' example 111 that It combines contrast with similarity. Kissing and killing have opposed connotations, the former being associated with love, and the latter with hatred and aggression.

Had you rather Caesar were living, and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all freemen? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him; but as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love;joy for his fortune; honour for Ius valour; and death for Ius ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended.

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